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Popular Russian Soup Recipes

January 20, 2019 | recipes | No Comments

Russian soups are quite well-liked and they are normally served in the afternoon. Mixed meat soup and vegetable soup are also well loved and these soups are usually topped with a dollop of sour cream.

Meat, potatoes, and cabbage are amongst the most typical elements in Russian soup recipes. Chicken soup recipes are well-liked in Russia and “kuryniy soup” is a delicious Russian chicken soup, which is served with rye bread. This chicken soup recipe is produced with vegetable broth and consists of chicken meat as properly as vegetables and clean herbs.

Mushroom soup is also a Russian favorite and this is made with refreshing mushrooms. The drinking water in which the mushrooms are cooked is changed numerous times in the course of the cooking course of action. It is garnished with dill and sour cream and is normally produced from sausages or some kind of meat.

Borscht – The Most Famous Russian Soup

Borscht is possibly the most well-known soup from the Soviet Union and it is bright red in color. It contains beets, potatoes, onion, garlic, cabbage, carrots, dill and much more. This Russian soup recipe makes two quarts of soup. Beef, kidney, ham, and incredibly hot dogs are utilized for the meat content and onions, olives, tomatoes, capers and much more are added for texture and flavor. Serve this soup with a dollop of sour cream, in the typical Russian style.

If you want to substitute any of the meats, that is fine. Perhaps you are a fan of chicken soup recipes, in which case you can use chicken instead of the very hot dogs or kidney.

Like a lot of other Russian soup recipes, this 1 is finest when you make it a day in advance, chill it overnight in the refrigerator and then warm it up and serve it the following day, since this lets the flavors combine better and the soup will have a superior taste.

How to make it:

Boil the beef chuck in the h2o for an hour and a half to make a juicy, rich broth. Get rid of and discard the beef bones. Saute it in the butter with the onions. Cook for twenty minutes, then add the other ingredients and cook for fifteen minutes more. Serve very hot. For more soup recipes check out

The Gourmet Cowboy Attacks Your Hunger

October 20, 2018 | recipes | No Comments

Gourmet Cowboy would seem to be an oxymoron, that is until you take a look at “The Gourmet Cowboy” by Bob Kinford. But then perhaps he is an oxymoron himself. Kinford has been a cowboy’s cowboy for most of his fifty-five years. Until meeting his wife Catie, eight years ago, he has spent most of his adult life working on remote ranches, taking care of cattle and training horses.

Kinford’s newest book, The Gourmet Cowboy (Cowboy style gourmet Cuisine) is a collection of over 90 recipes he has cooked on ranches across the west. Living miles from the nearest paved road, he did not have the convenience of stopping by a restaurant after twelve hours in the saddle so he had to cook for himself. His recipes are simple enough for a new bride, yet have a gourmet flair which would be the envy of any cooking show star. One great example is Smokey Shrimp Bisque:

20 Med shrimp10 cloves garlic1/2 C finely grated Muenster Cheese1 pt cream6 cherry tomatoes3 green onions2T olive oil1 t Fresh finely chopped basil1t fresh, finely chopped Rosemary

Clean and peel shrimp. Peel garlic. Grill garlic and shrimp for 3 minutes (preferably over charcoal,not gas). Cut cherry tomatoes into fourths. Chop green onion into inch long pieces. Saut�’ tomatoes, onion, Basil and Rosemary in olive oil over medium heat for three minutes, stirring cream and slowly stir in cheese. Raise heat to medium high. Once cream begins to boil, reduce to a simmer, stirring occasionally until cream begins to thicken. Add shrimp and garlic. Simmerfor 2 minutes.

Serves 4.

You can’t accuse this recipe of being a typical cowboy recipe anymore than you can accuse “The Gourmet Cowboy” of being a typical cowboy can view more recipes from this unique book ath and taking advantage of the Amazon “Search INside” feature.

How to Make Soup?

July 20, 2018 | recipes | No Comments

Lean, juicy beef, mutton, and veal, form the basis of all good soups; therefore it is advisable to procure those pieces which afford the richest succulence, and such as are fresh-killed. Stale meat renders them bad, and fat is not so well adapted for making them. The principal art in composing good rich soup, is so to proportion the several ingredients that the flavour of one shall not predominate over another, and that all the articles of which it is composed, shall form an agreeable whole. To accomplish this, care must be taken that the roots and herbs are perfectly well cleaned, and that the water is proportioned to the quantity of meat and other ingredients. Generally a quart of water may be allowed to a pound of meat for soups, and half the quantity for gravies. In making soups or gravies, gentle stewing or simmering is incomparably the best. It may be remarked, however, that a really good soup can never be made but in a well-closed vessel, although, perhaps, greater wholesomeness is obtained by an occasional exposure to the air. Soups will, in general, take from three to six hours doing, and are much better prepared the day before they are wanted. When the soup is cold, the fat may be much more easily and completely removed; and when it is poured off, care must be taken not to disturb the settlings at the bottom of the vessel, which are so fine that they will escape through a sieve. A tamis is the best strainer, and if the soup is strained while it is hot, let the tamis or cloth be previously soaked in cold water. Clear soups must be perfectly transparent, and thickened soups about the consistence of cream. To thicken and give body to soups and gravies, potato-mucilage, arrow-root, bread-raspings, isinglass, flour and butter, barley, rice, or oatmeal, in a little water rubbed well together, are used. A piece of boiled beef pounded to a pulp, with a bit of butter and flour, and rubbed through a sieve, and gradually incorporated with the soup, will be found an excellent addition. When the soup appears to be� too thin� or� too weak , the cover of the boiler should be taken off, and the contents allowed to boil till some of the watery parts have evaporated; or some of the thickening materials, above mentioned, should be added. When soups and gravies are kept from day to day in hot weather, they should be warmed up every day, and put into fresh scalded pans or tureens, and placed in a cool cellar. In temperate weather, every other day may be sufficient. Various herbs and vegetables are required for the purpose of making soups and gravies. Of these the principal are, Scotch barley, pearl barley, wheat flour, oatmeal, bread-raspings, pease, beans, rice, vermicelli, macaroni, isinglass, potato-mucilage, mushroom or mushroom ketchup, champignons, parsnips, carrots, beetroot, turnips, garlic, shalots and onions. Sliced onions, fried with butter and flour till they are browned, and then rubbed through a sieve, are excellent to heighten the colour and flavour of brown soups and sauces, and form the basis of many of the fine relishes furnished by the cook. The older and drier the onion, the stronger will be its flavour. Leeks, cucumber, or burnet vinegar; celery or celery-seed pounded. The latter, though equally strong, does not impart the delicate sweetness of the fresh vegetable; and when used as a substitute, its flavour should be corrected by the addition of a bit of sugar. Cress-seed, parsley, common thyme, lemon thyme, orange thyme, knotted marjoram, sage, mint, winter savoury, and basil. As fresh green basil is seldom to be procured, and its fine flavour is soon lost, the best way of preserving the extract is by pouring wine on the fresh leaves. For the seasoning of soups, bay-leaves, tomato, tarragon, chervil, burnet, allspice, cinnamon, ginger, nutmeg, clove, mace, black and white pepper, essence of anchovy, lemon-peel, and juice, and Seville orange-juice, are all taken. The latter imparts a finer flavour than the lemon, and the acid is much milder. These materials, with wine, mushroom ketchup, Harvey’s sauce, tomato sauce, combined in various proportions, are, with other ingredients, manipulated into an almost endless variety of excellent soups and gravies. Soups, which are intended to constitute the principal part of a meal, certainly ought not to be flavoured like sauces, which are only designed to give a relish to some particular dish.

Seb Rametta And The Original Soupman

April 20, 2018 | recipes | No Comments

Seb Rametta possses the business acumen, the courage, and the operational skills required to put his ideas into reality. Seb Rametta has vertically-integrated experience in all aspects of the food and restaurant industry, including franchising, marketing, sourcing, manufacturing, restaurant operations, logistics, supply chain and menu development. The success story that started with the Arnie’s Bagels, Inc, a wholesale manufacturer of all-natural premium, par-baked authentic New York bagels is far from being over.

As a highly regarded pioneer and leader in food industry, Seb Rametta has a keen eye for emerging opportunities, trends, and the shifting competitive environment. Thus, having built his wholesale bagel business to national leadership – with customers like McDonald’s, Disney World, Dunkin’ Donuts, Roy Rogers, Friendly’s, A&P Supermarkets, King’s Supermarkets, and other major national chains – Seb and his partners sold the business to Quaker Oats in 1994 at a huge profit.

Next up for Seb Rametta? Recognizing that shifts in health and the QSR market would put pressure on fried foods and open up new opportunities, Seb Rametta and his partner invested in Ranch*1 Group, Inc., an innovative New York City-based grilled-chicken franchise company.

“Ranch*1 had great recipes, great prices, a loyal customer base, a successful system and served fresh, healthful chicken” said Seb Rametta. “It met all our criteria; we wanted to dominate whatever market we entered, and Ranch*1 provided the edge we needed – including a nationally-visible location next door to the David Letterman Show. We teamed up with New York’s number one radio personality, Howard Stern, to promote Ranch*1 on the airwaves.”

Many people whould have stopped after the Ranch*1 success, but not Seb Rametta. Identifying the enormous possibilities in the “Original SoupMan” brand, Seb Rametta entered into an arrangement with Al Yeganeh in 2004, an arrangement which made the present company possible.

Responsible for the executive management of the company, Rametta is involved with day-to-day functions such as operations, sales and distribution. He is also involved with strategic relationships and joint ventures; product development; and customer experience. Seb Rametta’s involvement and commitment to the SoupMan entity from its early developmental phases provides him with pespective, knowledge and expertise which are indispensable for the current and future success of the company.

The company’s activities include ownership and and franchising of Original Soupman restaurants; distribution of a retail line of premium, gourmet “heat-n-serve soups,” and operation of an ecommerce website.